Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Neil Smith’

“A plantation can be a commons”: Re‐Earthing Sapelo Island through Abolition Ecology

May 25, 2020 Comments off

This was a long time in progress and came with all sorts of challenges but happy to have it out in the world.

Heynen, N. (2020). “A plantation can be a commons”: Re‐Earthing Sapelo Island through Abolition Ecology. Antipode.

Abstract
This paper is based on the 2018 Neil Smith Lecture presented at the University of St Andrews. It considers the plantation past/futures of Sapelo Island, Georgia, one of the Sea Islands forming an archipelago along the US Southeastern coast. I work through the abolitionist efforts of the Saltwater Geechee’s who have resided there since at least 1803 to better understand how we can mobilise an emancipatory politics of land and property and to produce commons that work to repair and heal the violence done through enslavement and ongoing displacement. I weave together a series of historical threads to better situate linked ideas of abolition democracy and abolition geography, and to extend the notion of abolition ecology as a strategic notion to connect Eurocentric based political ecologies with the emancipatory tradition of Black geographies.

Neil Smith’s Long Revolutionary Imperative

April 7, 2017 Comments off

Happy to announce that we published the special collection of papers about the work of Neil Smith as both an free e-book and a special issue of Antipode:

Heynen, N., A. Kent, K. McKittrick, V. Gidwani, W. Larner (Eds.), 2017. Revolutionary Imperative: Engaging the Work of Neil Smith. Wiley-Blackwell. [published simultaneously as a special issue of Antipode, 49 s1]

Papers in the special collection were written by a fantastic group of scholars, including Andrew Ross, Timothy Brennan, Noel Castree, Susan W.S. Millar, Don Mitchell, John Morrissey, Tom Slater, John Paul Jones III, Helga Leitner, Sallie A. Marston, Eric Sheppard, Setha Low, Patrick Bond and Greg Ruiters.

We, the editors, wrote this introductory essay, based on some of Neil’s archival letters that Don Mitchell allowed us temporary access to.  I’d urge folks to take a closer look at the cover art for the collection which is a portrait of Neil that Deb Cowen painted and allowed us to use.

Heynen, N. A. Kent, K. McKittrick, V. Gidwani, W. Larner (2017) “Neil Smith’s Long Revolutionary Imperative.” Antipode. 49(s1): 5-18.

Abstract: Whether writing about gentrification or nature, the production of space or the politics of scale, uneven development or public space, globalization or revolution, the geographer Neil Smith was nothing if not provocative. Neither Festschrift nor hagiography, this special issue of Antipode critically engages Smith’s work—not to unpick the rich tapestry, but to draw the threads out and spin them on in new directions. Consisting of newly commissioned essays by comrades from across the human sciences, it considers the entire range of Smith’s oeuvre. This paper introduces the essays by offering not only some thoughts about Smith’s intellectual contributions generally, but also new insight into the role he played in Antipode.

Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation Editorial Board: Thanking the first generation, welcoming the next.

September 11, 2013 Comments off

In 2007 I met Neil Smith and Derek Krissoff at the San Francisco AAG to discuss the idea of essentially re-creating a book series at the UGA Press that Neil had initially created at Temple UP (with Peter Wissoker).  For a host of reasons, Neil’s Place, Culture, and Politics series only produced two (very good) books including George Henderson’s California and the Fictions of Capital and Katharyne Mitchell’s Crossing the Neoliberal Line Pacific Rim Migration and the Metropolis before it prematurely shut down.

Melissa Wright, Andy Herod and I,  along with Derek Krissoff, got the Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation series off the ground at UGA Press later that year, and then in 2011, Deb Cowen replaced Andy as one of our co-editors.  More recently, Derek went off to be the Editor in Chief of the University of Nebraska Press, and we have been lucky to start working with the UGA Press’ new Editor in Chief, Mick Gusinde-Duffy.

Nineteen books later, with a large number more either under contract or at various stages of review or publication, many people tell us they think the series is doing very well.  We agree.

While ultimately it is the quality of the books that make a book series, much of the early success of the series has resulted from the commitment and support of our inaugural editorial advisory board.  The members of that board include:

Sharad Chari (University of Witwatersand); Bradon Ellem (University of Sydney), Gillian Hart (University of California, Berkeley), Andy Herod (University of Georgia), Jennifer Hyndman (York University), Larry Knopp (University of Washington, Tacoma), Heidi Nast (Depaul University),  Jamie Peck (University of British Columbia), Frances Fox Piven (City University of New York), Laura Pulido (University of Southern California), Paul Routledge (Leeds University), Bobby Wilson (University of Alabama).

We are very grateful for all of their guidance and the solidarity they brought to this endeavor.  As they say, “we couldn’t have done this without you”.  As these things go however, we have decided it is time to refresh the board as we move into the next phase of the series, so we are very pleased to announce the second generation of the GOJST board, which includes:

Mathew Coleman (Ohio State University), Sapana Doshi (University of Arizona), Zeynep Gambetti (Boğaziçi University), Geoff Mann (Simon Fraser University),  James McCarthy (Clark University), Beverly Mullings (Queen’s University), Harvey Neo (National University of Singapore), Geraldine Pratt (University of British Columbia), Ananya Roy (University of California, Berkeley), Michael Watts, (University of California, Berkeley), Ruth Wilson Gilmore (CUNY Graduate Center), Jamie Winders (Syracuse University), Brenda S.A. Yeoh
(National University of Singapore).

One of the members of the initial editorial board who I did not yet thank is Neil Smith, who served until he passed away on September 29th, 2012.  As we near the first anniversary of Neil’s passing, we at the series are working to launch a Neil Smith Book Prize in recognition of his inspiration, and the other many forms of help he offered getting the series up and going.  We hope the Neil Smith Book Prize will not only honor Neil, but also serve to keep the series growing with the highest caliber scholarship possible.

Stay tuned to learn more about efforts to help us establish the book prize in Neil’s name when we launch our fund raising drive in the coming months.