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Posts Tagged ‘Urban Political Ecology (UPE)’

Urban Political Ecology III: The Gendered and Queer Century

May 1, 2017 Comments off

Here is my third and final report on urban political ecology (UPE) in Progress in Human Geography.  A shout out to Noel Castree for excellent editorial guidance on the lot of these.

Heynen, N. (2017; on-line first) “Urban Political Ecology III: The Gendered and Queer Century” Progress in Human Geography.

Abstract:

Given the ongoing importance of nature in the city, better grappling with the gendering and queering of urban political ecology offers important insights that collectively provides important political possibilities. The cross-currents of feminist political ecology, queer ecology, queer urbanism and more general contributions to feminist urban geography create critical opportunities to expand UPE’s horizons toward more egalitarian and praxis-centered prospects. These intellectual threads in conversation with the broader Marxist roots of UPE, and other second-generation variants, including what I have previously called abolition ecology, combine to at once show the ongoing promises of heterodox UPE and at the same time contribute more broadly beyond the realm of UPE.

Toward an Abolition Ecology

March 15, 2017 Comments off

This is one of my earliest essays on what is much larger project on abolition ecology.  I was happy to have been asked to participate on the Editorial Review Board of the new Abolition: A Journal of Insurgent Politics which quickly became a logical home for this essay which will be in the inaugural issue:

Heynen, N. (2017; on-line first) “Toward an Abolition Ecology” Abolition: A Journal of Insurgent Politics.

“Abolitionist politics continue to evolve in response to the ways racial capitalism exploits, oppresses and commits violence through uneven racial development. As environmental relations have always been part of this, in this short essay, Nik Heynen starts to grapple with what an ‘abolition ecology’ would look like.”

Megapolitan Political Ecology and Urban Metabolism in Southern Appalachia

September 3, 2014 Comments off

For several years I have been directing something called the Coweeta Listening Project (CLP).  A subset of this group has just published a first-cut effort to think through the rapid exurbanization within southern Appalachia through megapolitan geographies, urban political ecology, and notions of urban metabolism.

Gustafson, S., N. Heynen, J.L. Rice, T. Gragson, J. M. Shepherd, C.Strother (2014) “Megapolitan Political Ecology and Urban Metabolism in Southern Appalachia.” Professional Geographer 66(1): 688-694.

Abstract

Drawing on megapolitan geographies, urban political ecology, and urban metabolism as theoretical frameworks, this article theoretically and empirically explores megapolitan political ecology. First, we elucidate a theoretical framework in the context of southern Appalachia and, in particular, the Piedmont megapolitan region, suggesting that the megapolitan region is a useful scale through which to understand urban metabolic connections that constitute this rapidly urbanizing area. We also push the environmental history and geography literature of the U.S. South and southern Appalachia to consider the central role urban metabolic connections play in the region’s pressing social and environmental crises. Second, we empirically illuminate these human and nonhuman urban metabolisms across the Piedmont megapolitan region using data from the Coweeta Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, especially highlighting a growing “ring of asphalt” that epitomizes several developing changes to patterns of metabolism. The conclusion suggests that changing urban metabolisms indicated by Coweeta LTER data, ranging from flows of people to flows of water, pose a complicated problem for regional governance and vitality in the future.

New Hungarian Translated Collection on Critical Urban Studies (Kritikai Városkutatás) includes Swyngedouw and Heynen (2003)

February 16, 2014 Comments off

A new book on Critical Urban Studies (Kritikai Városkutatás) has just been published by L’Harmattan Budapest. It was edited by Csaba Jelinek, Judit Bodnar, Marton Czirfusz, and Zoltan Gyimesi. In addition to a number of exciting translations by other urban scholars the collection also includes a paper I wrote with Erik Swyngedouw published in Antipode in 2003.

Table of Contents and Swyngedouw, E., and N.C. Heynen (2014) “Városi politikai ökológia, igazságosság és a léptékek politikája.” In (eds.) Jelinek Csaba, Bodnár Judit, Czirfusz Márton, Gyimesi Zoltán. Kritikai városkutatás pp. 394-416

Urban political ecology I: The urban century in Progress in Human Geography

September 4, 2013 Comments off

I’ve just got word that my first (of three) reviews on the state of urban political ecology (UPE) titled “Urban political ecology I: The urban century has been published on the Progress in Human Geography Online First web site.

Abstract
It has been over 15 years since the term ‘urban political ecology’ (UPE) was coined. While still often not
incorporated into larger discussion of political ecology, its growing visibility in the published literature
suggests that it has gone beyond an emerging theoretical lens to one that has fully emerged. This report
characterizes the current literature that explicitly utilizes the language of UPE, discusses its theoretical
evolution that is now seeing a second wave, as well as catalogs some of the new arenas through which the
sub-field has offered novel insights into the socionatural unevenness of cities. A central contribution of this
survey is to illustrate the myriad articulations of how urban environmental and social change co-determine
each other and how these metabolic processes offer insights into creative pathways toward more democratic
urban environmental politics.

Keywords
cities, political ecology, urban geography, urban metabolism, urban political ecology (UPE)

Urban Forests and Political Ecologies in Toronto

April 21, 2013 Comments off

Tested out some new ideas about “Abolition Ecology” with talk at the Urban Forests & Political Ecologies conference in Toronto, April 18-20th, 2013.  The conference was hosted by the Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University; Faculty of Forestry, University of Toronto; and the Humber Arboretum & Centre for Urban Ecology.  It was a well organized and interesting event.  Thanks to Adrina Bardekjian and Sadia Butt for their efforts as well as other organizers.

ufpe_poster_final_2013

Urban Political Ecology is alive and well at the LA AAG

April 10, 2013 Comments off

In response to questions about the state of Urban Political Ecology (UPE), my colleague Jenn Rice and I organized a series of four really good sessions to sus out the health of this emerging sub-disciplinary approach.  The good news is that in my opinion the presenters showed without a doubt that UPE is alive and well.  Here are links to the sessions for the curious:

Urban Political Ecology Redux I
http://meridian.aag.org/callforpapers/program/SessionDetail.cfm?SessionID=16739

Urban Political Ecology Redux II
http://meridian.aag.org/callforpapers/program/SessionDetail.cfm?SessionID=16740

Urban Political Ecology Redux III
http://meridian.aag.org/callforpapers/program/SessionDetail.cfm?SessionID=16741

Urban Political Ecology Redux IV
http://meridian.aag.org/callforpapers/program/SessionDetail.cfm?SessionID=16742